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Industry News
Embraer reportedly evaluating commercial jet program direction

The plane maker, best known for its commuter jet planes, is studying whether to design an entirely new single-aisle, twin-engine jetliner or whether to offer customers a newer, fuel-efficient engine for its current E-195.

Author:
Posted on: 9/13/2010
Source: CompositesWorld

A Sept. 9 report in The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) says that Brazilian aerospace manufacturer Embraer Brasileira de Aeronautica S.A. will decide by the end of 2010 how to proceed with the future of its commercial jet program.

The plane maker, best known for its commuter jet planes, according to the report, is studying whether to design an entirely new single-aisle, twin-engine jetliner or whether to offer customers a newer, fuel-efficient engine for its current E-195, Embraer spokesman Carlos Eduardo Camargo told the newspaper. A third option also being considered is to make only minor modifications to the current plane, which seats about 120 passengers and has been a popular choice for airlines with relatively short routes, often to smaller cities.

The evaluation Embraer is doing is similar to that of Boeing and Airbus, which are also expected to decide by the end of the year how to proceed with their best-selling lines of narrow-body jets, the 737 and the A320 respectively.

Embraer competes most directly with Bombardier Inc. (Montreal, Quebest, Canada), which is currently developing the CSeries jet, a newly designed 150-seat composite-material narrow-body jetliner designed to take on the lower end narrow-body offerings from Boeing and Airbus.

Embraer's Camargo, according to the report, says his company wants no part of that fight. "We want to be complementary to (airlines') Airbus and Boeing fleets," and not be competing with the two industry behemoths, he said.

The E-195, says the report, could be modified with a new wing and other relatively minor improvements that don't carry the costs associated with either designing a new jet from scratch or revamping a plane to carry new engines.
"Working on the aerodynamics, we think we can improve the efficiency of the (existing) airplane," Camargo said.

Information: Click here for original WSJ report.

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