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Industry News
Boeing, NASA sign space launch system contract

Under the $2.8 billion contract, Boeing will develop the core stage of the Space Launch System, designed to propel humans back to deep space exploration.

Author:
Posted on: 7/8/2014
Source: CompositesWorld

Boeing (Chicago, Ill., USA) reported on July 2 that it has finalized a contract with NASA to develop the core stage of the Space Launch System (SLS), the most powerful rocket ever built and destined to propel America’s return to human exploration of deep space.

The $2.8 billion contract includes the avionics. Boeing has been tasked to study the SLS Exploration Upper Stage, which will further expand mission range and payload capabilities. The agreement comes as NASA and the Boeing team complete the critical design review (CDR) on the core stage – the last major review before full production begins.

“Our teams have dedicated themselves to ensuring that the SLS – the largest ever -- will be built safely, affordably and on time,” says Virginia Barnes, Boeing SLS vice president and program manager. “We are passionate about NASA’s mission to explore deep space. It’s a very personal mission, as well as a national mandate.”

During the CDR, which began June 2, experts examined and confirmed the final design of the rocket’s cryogenic stages that will hold liquefied hydrogen and oxygen. This milestone marks NASA’s first CDR on a deep-space human exploration launch vehicle since 1961, when the Saturn V rocket underwent a similar design review as the United States sought to land an astronaut on the moon. Boeing participated in that CDR as well, as the three stages of the Saturn V were built by Boeing and its heritage companies Douglas Aircraft and North American Aviation.

Scheduled for its initial test flight in 2017, the SLS is designed to be flexible and evolvable to meet a variety of crew and cargo mission needs. The initial flight-test configuration will provide a 77-ton capacity, and the final evolved two-stage configuration will provide a lift capability of more than 143 tons. 

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