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Industry News
ACMA promotes incorporation of FRP composites in IBC

The ACMA announced it is taking an active role in introducing composites into the International Building Code (IBC).

Author:
Posted on: 3/17/2008
Source: CompositesWorld

The American Composites Manufacturers Association (ACMA) announced on March 13 its active role in introducing FRP composites into the International Building Code (IBC) to promote acceptance of composites used in building construction. During the International Code Council (ICC) public hearings on February 26, the Fire Safety Committee voted to accept ACMA’s proposal as the initial step to including language introducing FRP composites into the IBC and outlining the proper use of FRP used in non-structural applications.

“This is a great initial step for ACMA,” said ACMA President John Tickle. “Getting proper treatment and recognition for composites is critical to the continued growth of the industry.”

ACMA representatives had attended the ICC’s public hearings in Palm Springs, Calif., to represent the composites industry’s position on updating the International Building Code. These hearings, attended by many building code officials in the U.S., are intended to initially review and consider changes to the building code.

An ACMA team of speakers led by past President Bill Kreysler (Kreysler & Associates) and Board Member Pete Emrich (MFG) spoke in favor of the submitted proposal. “This is a major step forward in getting composites treated the same as traditional materials,” said Kreysler “This has the potential of growing the architectural market for ACMA members.”

After a public comment period of several months when code officials and members of the ICC are allowed to submit amendments to the draft code changes, the entire code body will vote for approval at a public meeting in September. If no comments are received to the ACMA proposal, the language will be automatically adapted into the 2009 edition of the IBC.

For ACMA membership information, call 703.525.0511, or email:Info@acmanet.org. Visit ACMA's website at www.ACMAnet.org.

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